Barneys Madison Avenue

Barneys New York asked JHA to design its luxury women’s handbag area—featuring luxury collections such as Chloé and Balenciaga—in the Madison Avenue flagship store in New York City to invigorate sales and capitalize on main floor foot traffic. JHA created the 40 foot-long wall, completed in 2001, inspired by the artistic compositions of Mondrian and Le Corbusier’s interior of Notre dame du Haut at Ronchamp. From a distance, the minimalist materials appear to be a striking combination of brushed, polished stainless steel and wood. Upon closer inspection, the detailed cerused silver oak paneling and linen wall covering innovatively create a warm, natural backdrop that romances the product. Donald Judd-like stainless steel boxes frame each bags individually presenting every designer piece as a work of art.Barneys Madison Avenue Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Madison Avenue Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Madison Avenue Jeffrey Hutchison

Ippolita Madison Avenue

After partnering on multiple shop-in-shop projects for IPPOLITA within luxury department stores (including Bloomingdales, Neiman Marcus, and Saks Fifth Avenue), the fashion jewelry brand asked JHA to design its first freestanding shop in the United States. Located on Madison Avenue in New York City, IPPOLITA’s 500 square-foot boutique mirrors the brand’s commitment to craftsmanship and artistry—a perfect fit for the jewelry line founded by Italian artist and sculptor, Ippolita. By carefully selecting materials that underscore the beauty of handcrafted work, JHA subtly saturated the intimate space with a shining sense of understated richness. Wide-plank cerused oak wood floors, laid in a herringbone pattern, complement the warm, hand-applied plaster walls. A display case detailed with a hand-carved, dark bronze framework and natural travertine marble serves as the flagship store’s focal point. And much like a colorful jewel in a bangle, a steel-blue rug punctuates the decidedly modern shop. Cantilevered from the rear wall, a minimal floating glass box supported by opulent hammered light-bronze metalwork provides additional display. Above all these elements, a sculptural chandelier composed of glazed and gilded porcelain flowers (created by artist Jess LaRotundia), floats from the ceiling.Ippolita Madison Avenue Jeffrey HutchisonIppolita Madison Avenue Jeffrey HutchisonIppolita Madison Avenue Jeffrey HutchisonIppolita Madison Avenue Jeffrey Hutchison

Dooney & Bourke Macau

Dooney & Bourke turned to JHA to create a bold, new visual language for the brand while simultaneously maintaining respect for the legacy of the company. JHA drew from Founder Peter Dooney’s passion for sailing to produce the 2,500 square-foot, boutique within the Venetian Macau Resort. By interpreting nautical-inspired details in a modern way, JHA’s design transports customers into a finely wrought “yacht.” In the entryway, cherry-wood curved slatted walls provide a rich setting for the product. Entering the first room of the leather goods store, beautiful lacquered wood cabinetry with lighting details highlight the merchandise. Traveling into the space, the sleek second room is comprised of long, lit wood shelves and a vaulted ceiling. The intimate proportion of this location allows customers to experience the finely detailed product at close proximity. Throughout the boutique, travertine marble floors, Venetian plaster, and antique brass elements underscore the classic luxury of the Dooney & Bourke brand.Dooney & Bourke Macau Jeffrey HutchisonDooney & Bourke Macau Jeffrey HutchisonDooney & Bourke Macau Jeffrey HutchisonDooney & Bourke Macau Jeffrey HutchisonDooney & Bourke Macau Jeffrey Hutchison

HMX Showrooms

JHA retrofitted an existing location in New York City’s Midtown to create a flexible combination showroom/workspace for the brands under HMX Group’s umbrella. To develop a unifying, masculine backdrop for multiple menswear labels including Hickey Freeman and Hart Schaffner Marx, JHA balanced the heritage of the brands with modern detailing. Historic oil paintings and original prints with matting covered in suiting fabrics enhanced the space. Walnut wood paneling was balanced with the sleekness of a gray “driftwood” floor and grass-cloth wall covering, and upholstered furniture covered in leather and suiting fabrics of pin stripes and herringbones underscored the luxury of the brands. And for the space’s centerpiece, the iconic Hickey Freeman Crest was elevated to sculpture—in a burl wood shadowbox with the brand’s herringbone suit fabric serving as its backdrop.HMX Showrooms Jeffrey HutchisonHMX Showrooms Jeffrey HutchisonHMX Showrooms Jeffrey HutchisonHMX Showrooms Jeffrey HutchisonHMX Showrooms Jeffrey Hutchison

Marithe + Francois Girbaud Showroom

Completed in 2005, JHA designed this 14,000 square-foot showroom and office space located in New York City with a distinctly modern atmosphere instilled with references to nature, reflecting the Marithé + François Girbaud brand’s DNA. Organic elements—including shapes, materials, and colors—were inspired by the natural washes used in the French designers’ clothing line. The main showroom features stylized “branches” extending from the custom metal shelving/rack system that displays the collection. In the “Le Jean” showroom, metal tiles in various shades of green suggest a pixilated landscape panorama. Icy-blue walls and a shiny Ardex floor give the space an ethereal quality. Opposite the 10-feet-tall windows that let natural light into the space, backlit walls feature black-and-white images of leaves, created by stretching BarRisol fabric over a metal frame.Marithe + Francois Girbaud Showroom Jeffrey HutchisonMarithe + Francois Girbaud Showroom Jeffrey HutchisonMarithe + Francois Girbaud Showroom Jeffrey HutchisonMarithe + Francois Girbaud Showroom Jeffrey HutchisonMarithe + Francois Girbaud Showroom Jeffrey Hutchison

Streets of Georgetown

HMX Group’s Chief Creative Office Joseph Abboud sought out JHA to create a multi-brand retail concept for their menswear labels (including Hickey Freeman, Hart Schaffner Marx, and Coppley)—a concept with roots in the legacy of fine American menswear. For the Georgetown location, residing in a Federal-style carriage house, JHA mindfully preserved details throughout the 6,000 square-foot space while updating the overall feel with modern elements. A mix of aged materials (such as distressed oak and blackened steel) and antiques (like vintage vitrine cases and artwork), and refined materials (including curtains and furniture covered in Hickey Freeman suiting fabrics) are juxtaposed against industrial elements such as wood-and-steel hanging racks and shelves, creating an eclectic, masculine atmosphere. A made-to-measure section is designed to feel like a haberdasher’s studio, and reinforces the tailoring heritage of the HMX brands.Streets of Georgetown Jeffrey HutchisonStreets of Georgetown Jeffrey HutchisonStreets of Georgetown Jeffrey HutchisonStreets of Georgetown Jeffrey HutchisonStreets of Georgetown Jeffrey Hutchison

Shinsegae Boon The Shop

Home of both emerging and fashion-forward designer brands such as Comme des Garçons and Stella McCartney, Boon the Shop is a specialty boutique owned and operated by Shinsegae. For the Shop located on the 3rd floor of the Gangnam store in Seoul, JHA created the concept of transforming this 2,500 square-foot space into a luxurious salon that mixes in modern minimalist elements true to the Shinsegae brand. This stylistic mash-up creates an aesthetic tension between the worlds of modern and classic, providing an environment that’s intimate, yet engaging for costumers.Shinsegae Boon The Shop Jeffrey HutchisonShinsegae Boon The Shop Jeffrey HutchisonShinsegae Boon The Shop Jeffrey HutchisonShinsegae Boon The Shop Jeffrey HutchisonShinsegae Boon The Shop Jeffrey HutchisonShinsegae Boon The Shop Jeffrey HutchisonShinsegae Boon The Shop Jeffrey Hutchison

Façonnable Jeans

For a brand that embraces a mix of modern design along with the history of denim and great tailoring, JHA designed Façonnable’s store—located on the Rue Paradis in Nice, France—as an atelier of a young fashion designer whose father left him his custom tailoring business. With the air of an apartment transformed into a store, the style of the architecture shifts throughout the space. Decorative ceramic tile floor and antique-inspired oak-and-brass fixtures showcase the merchandise on the first level. The second level has a “workroom” feel, with antique wood floors and salvaged fixtures. The inclusion of found modern furniture and décor evoke a residential ambiance. Witty decorative elements, such as the wall of thread spools and clocks in the stairwell, speak to the brand’s roots.Ippolita Madison Avenue Jeffrey HutchisonIppolita Madison Avenue Jeffrey HutchisonIppolita Madison Avenue Jeffrey HutchisonIppolita Madison Avenue Jeffrey HutchisonIppolita Madison Avenue Jeffrey HutchisonIppolita Madison Avenue Jeffrey HutchisonIppolita Madison Avenue Jeffrey Hutchison

Barneys Tokyo

In 2004, Barneys New York opened an outpost in Tokyo’s bustling Ginza district housed in the prestigious Kojunsha Building, built in 1880. JHA’s design references elaborate textures and plays on depth, evoking a new interpretation of classic-modern spaces from the 1940s-1950s. By utilizing different palettes of materials, JHA created a unique feeling on each of the store’s three levels. Artistic installations throughout the space imbue the store with a sense of originality and craftsmanship. The interior’s focal point, a massive three-story, vertical brushed-steel sculpture frames a central staircase connecting all three floors. The almost-diaphanous structure was built with non-symmetrical cutouts that display designer information and acts as a backdrop for seasonal store themes.Barneys Tokyo Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Tokyo Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Tokyo Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Tokyo Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Tokyo Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Tokyo Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Tokyo Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Tokyo Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Tokyo Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Tokyo Jeffrey Hutchison

Shinsegae Gangnam Men’s Designer

South Korea’s preeminent luxury multi-brand fashion retailer tapped JHA to redefine their consumer experience on the menswear floor of their flagship store in Seoul. Drawing inspiration from early Modern Cubist art and the designs of the De Stijl movement, JHA created a fresh and unifying look for the space so that brands from
Burberry to Tom Ford can stand “shoulder to shoulder” with one another. Amongst the clean wood walls and ceilings, dark bronze frames each designer’s space on the floor. Light coves in the ceiling cast a rich, ambient light onto the displays below. Decorative screens throughout the floor, printed with a modern nature pattern, provoke a sensation of peering through the trees and delineate the space without inhibiting the open feel of the floor. A café with a working fireplace creates an at-home environment, inviting customers to linger at ease.Shinsegae Gangnam Men's Designer Jeffrey HutchisonShinsegae Gangnam Men's Designer Jeffrey HutchisonShinsegae Gangnam Men's Designer Jeffrey HutchisonShinsegae Gangnam Men's Designer Jeffrey HutchisonShinsegae Gangnam Men's Designer Jeffrey HutchisonShinsegae Gangnam Men's Designer Jeffrey HutchisonShinsegae Gangnam Men's Designer Jeffrey Hutchison

Barneys Boston

In the spring of 2006, Barneys New York opened a flagship store in the upscale Copley Place shopping center in Boston, Massachusetts. For the location’s internal façade JHA devised a dramatic entry as a way of defining the start of the Barneys experience: a two-story glass and black metal Mondrian-inspired wall, creating a beacon-like entrance to draw customers inside—even from the center of the development. The 45,000 square-foot open-air space centers around a Y-shaped staircase that leads up to a large skylight, letting natural light pour in. Luxurious materials and rich detailing soften the modernist style of the development, including a marble mosaic and limestone floor, and a working fireplace in the women’s shoe department that creates a warm environment in the often-cold Boston climate.Barneys Boston Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Boston Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Boston Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Boston Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Boston Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Boston Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Boston Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Boston Jeffrey Hutchison

Shinsegae Gangnam Women’s Designer

For the 36,000 square-foot women’s floor of Shinsegae’s flagship store in Seoul, JHA designed a multi-branded shopping world with a younger customer in mind. To maintain the luxury retailer’s strong, minimalist modern aesthetic while allowing brands like Prada and Chanel to preserve their own presence, JHA created a series of brand shops on the floor, each “wrapped” in a curved façade composed of shaped and fritted glass. The fritted pattern of the glass artistically reveals merchandise from the outside of the shop, while evoking an ethereal, “cloud-like” feel. To further engage customers, JHA also included interactive functions on the floor, such as a nail salon and pop-up shops.Shinsegae Gangnam Women's Designer Jeffrey HutchisonShinsegae Gangnam Women's Designer Jeffrey HutchisonShinsegae Gangnam Women's Designer Jeffrey HutchisonShinsegae Gangnam Women's Designer Jeffrey HutchisonShinsegae Gangnam Women's Designer Jeffrey HutchisonShinsegae Gangnam Women's Designer Jeffrey Hutchison

Barneys
San Francisco

In the heart of the high-end Union Square district, JHA designed a shopping destination that is quintessentially Barneys while retaining the landmark building’s San Francisco charm. The existing structure at 77 O’Farrell Street was originally designed by Lansburgh & Joseph in 1907 as a department store, and has since undergone many transformations. JHA revived the building’s natural heritage for its re-opening in the fall of 2007 while updating the interior and exterior using the Barneys “vocabulary” of mixing handcrafted elements with modern refinement. With the use of natural light, unifying staircases, and thoughtfully designing every one of the seven floors with its own special components, JHA underscored the residential aesthetic of the location.Barneys San Francisco Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys San Francisco Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys San Francisco Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys San Francisco Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys San Francisco Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys San Francisco Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys San Francisco Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys San Francisco Jeffrey Hutchison

Casa Palacio

Mexico’s major department store group Palacio di Hierro approached JHA to redesign the concept for its home store, Casa Palacio, located in the Centro Santa Fe Mall in Mexico City. The entrance of the 60,000 square-foot, three-floor emporium suggests a grand, traditional market with elements such as terra cotta tile, iron columns, and ceramic tile trim, all topped by a modern lattice canopy. Customers move through this space out into a natural light-filled “street” lined with the façade of multiple faux homes: two modern houses (one paying homage to great Mexican architect, Luis Barrigan), two classic Italianate-style houses, and one classic mansion townhouse showcase furniture and other merchandise. Unlike other home stores, JHA’s Casa Palacio presents brands (the store features over 60, including SubZero, Artemide, and Table Hermès) in the context of a house of a similar style, inciting customers to connect to the product in a more emotional way.Casa Palacio Jeffrey HutchisonCasa Palacio Jeffrey HutchisonCasa Palacio Jeffrey HutchisonCasa Palacio Jeffrey HutchisonCasa Palacio Jeffrey HutchisonCasa Palacio Jeffrey HutchisonCasa Palacio Jeffrey HutchisonCasa Palacio Jeffrey HutchisonCasa Palacio Jeffrey HutchisonCasa Palacio Jeffrey HutchisonCasa Palacio Jeffrey Hutchison

Barneys
Las Vegas

JHA translated the elegance of Barneys New York for the excitement and intensity of Las Vegas in the outpost’s 81,000 square-foot emporium that opened in 2008 within the Palazzo Casino and Hotel complex. Three floors feature a recurring theme of modern-baroque detailing mixed with clean shapes and lines. A patterned ceiling and a dramatic spiral staircase convey brash opulence on the ground floor. Around the perimeter of the top two floors, JHA designed a 45-foot fritted glass box carved with a sunburst pattern using stylized versions of card symbols (such as hearts, spades, and diamonds)—in keeping with the Las Vegas vernacular.Barneys Las Vegas Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Las Vegas Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Las Vegas Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Las Vegas Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Las Vegas Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Las Vegas Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Las Vegas Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Las Vegas Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Las Vegas Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Las Vegas Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Las Vegas Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Las Vegas Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Las Vegas Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Las Vegas Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Las Vegas Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Las Vegas Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Las Vegas Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Las Vegas Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Las Vegas Jeffrey Hutchison

Barneys Chicago

At the corner of Oak and Rush in Chicago’s fashion district, JHA designed a style emporium that stays true to the urbane Barneys New York aesthetic while honoring the Windy City’s great architectural heritage. The 91,500 square-foot, six-story outpost that opened in 2009 evokes iconic Chicago structures, like Louis Sullivan’s Carson Pirie Scott store, while implementing fresh, clean elements that reflect the Barneys sensibility. A 5-story curved glass “curtain wall” unveiling a dramatic 3-story staircase forms the building’s façade. Indiana limestone and bronze-framed windows enhance its classic design. Inside, geometric murals, sculptural staircases, and sweeping vistas reflect the luxury of Chicago, while gallery-like elements showcase the tantalizing selection of merchandise.Barneys Chicago Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Chicago Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Chicago Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Chicago Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Chicago Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Chicago Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Chicago Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Chicago Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Chicago Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Chicago Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Chicago Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Chicago Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Chicago Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Chicago Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Chicago Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Chicago Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Chicago Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Chicago Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Chicago Jeffrey HutchisonBarneys Chicago Jeffrey Hutchison